Residence permit (long term visa)

最終更新日: 14.04.2015 // A residence permit is a permit that lets you reside in Norway over a long period of time – also referred to as a long term visa. Anyone who is planning to stay in Norway for more than 90 days must apply for a residence permit. There are several different types of residence permits, with the most common being related to work, studies or family immigration.

Anyone staying in Norway more than 90 days must apply for a residence permit. To have your application granted you must normally have a relation to Norway, i.e. offer of employment, acceptance to an educational institution, or a close relative living in Norway. Residence permits will generally not be granted when the purpose of the travel is tourism or regular business trip activities. In such cases Japanese citizens should use their 90-day visa exemption to visit Norway. Other nationalities that need a visa to enter Norway should refer to our pages for short term Schengen visa.

An application for residence permit is handled by the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) in Norway. All applications for residence permits received at the Embassy in Tokyo will be forwarded to UDI for processing. Proper preparation of documents with sufficient copies, apostille and translation is important. Please make sure to carefully read how to prepare your application before you make an application for residence permit.

If your residence permit is granted various rights and obligations may be applicable to you. See below for more information.

When you apply for residence permit you must fill in a checklist of which documents that you will submit with the application. It is important that you fill in all relevant sections of the check list and sign it. If it is not possible to provide the required documentation, you must enclose a statement that explains why these documents are not available. Your application may be rejected based on incomplete information or documentation. Find the checklist for your type of residence permit by following the links below.

Normal flow of application

Residence permit for work
            Residence permit for skilled workers
            Residence permit for seconded employees
            Residence permit for working holiday
            Residence permit for trainees

Residence permit for studies
            Residence permit for studies at university or similar        
            Residence permit for researchers with own funds

Residence permit for family immigration
            Family immigration with reference person living in Norway
            Family immigration with fiancé living in Norway
            Family immigration with EEA national living in Norway

Rights and obligations 

 Normal flow of application

  1. Read relevant information on this page, as well as Preparing an Application for Visa or Residence Permit and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
  2. Prepare application and collect necessary documents.
  3. Register your application and pay the application fee online through the Application Portal.
  4. Contact the Embassy to make an appointment, and deliver documents on appointed day.
  5. The case is sent to the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration for consideration.
  6. Wait until the Embassy notifies you about a decision in your case.
  7. If you need a visa to enter the Schengen area, contact the Embassy to have an entry visa issued. See FAQ if you do not know if you need a visa or not.
  8. Go to Norway, and visit your local police station within one week after entry.
  9. Your residence card will be sent to your registered address within short time.

Residence permit for work

Checklists with the required documents for various kinds of applications for residence permit for work can be found at UDI’s  homepage. Please find and prepare the one that is relevant for your situation.

If your residence permit is granted you must usually enter Norway and register at the local police station within 6 months from the date your permit was granted.

Here follows some of the most common types of residence permits for work. For a full overview and more detailed information about each type, please refer to UDI’s homepage.

Note that applicants for residence permit for researchers with own funds, researchers that does not have an offer of regular employment from a Norwegian research institution, should apply for a residence permit for studies.

Residence permit for skilled workers

  • You must have received a concrete offer of employment from one employer in Norway, with your salary being paid from Norway.
  • The job must normally be full time.
  • The job you are offered must require qualifications as a skilled worker. You must have the qualifications that the job requires.
  • The pay and working conditions must not be poorer than what is normal in Norway. It is up to your employer to ensure that you receive sufficient pay and working conditions.
  • You must register your application at the Application Portal before delivering your documents. Please use the application form for "Work", and the checklist for "Skilled Worker (with a Norwegian employer)".

Residence permit for seconded employees

  • You must be an employee of a foreign company. 
  • A contract must have been entered into between your foreign employer and a Norwegian company. 
  • The contract must state that you are to provide services of a limited duration in Norway. 
  • Your salary must be paid from your foreign employer.  
  • As a rule, the assignment must be limited to one specific Norwegian company 
  • There is no requirement for the assignment to be full time. 
  • The pay and working conditions must not be poorer than what is normal in Norway. It is up to the Norwegian company to ensure that you receive sufficient pay and working conditions. 
  • You must register your application at the Application Portal before delivering your documents. Please use the application form for "Work", and the checklist for "Seconded Employee".

Residence permit for working holiday

  • You must be a resident of Japan at the time of application. This is documented by a residence certificate - juminhyo. You can provide your own translation of the juminhyou.
  • You must be between 18 and 30 years of age when the application is delivered. It is ok if you turn 31 after you have delivered your application.
  • The main reason for travel must be to holiday - tourism. You are not allowed to study more than three months, nor work for the same employer more than six months.
  • You must have a Japanese passport.
  • You must have sufficient funds to support yourself for the first three months in Norway. Sufficient funds is considered to be NOK 10092 per month.
  • You must intend to leave Norway after the end of the working holiday. You do however not have to buy a return ticket to Japan before entering Norway.
  • You must have general good health, and be insured for medical emergencies and treatment. Please use the following templates to document this.
    Certificate of Health
    Declaration of Intent
  • You must register your application at the Application Portal before delivering your documents. Please use the application form for "Work", and the checklist for "working holiday for young adults from Japan".
  •  When filling out Reference Information on the Application Portal, please select “Other, without employer in Norway”. Under details please select “Other Professionals” and input “Working Holiday” as type of work. 

Residence permit for trainees

  • You must still be a student or in vocational training. If you have already completed your education you must apply according to guidelines for skilled workers.
  • You must have turned 15 years of age, and have your parent’s consent if you are aged between 15 and 18.
  • You must have received a concrete offer of employment. It must contain a description of your tasks, the number of hours a week you will be working, your monthly pay, and how long you will be working for. A link to a standard contract form can be found on the checklist for trainees.
  • The pay and working conditions must not be poorer than what is normal in Norway. It is up to the Norwegian company to ensure that you receive sufficient pay and working conditions.
  • As a rule, the employment must concern full time work. 
  • You must be guaranteed accommodation during the period that the application covers. Your employer can often help you guarantee for accommodation. 
  • You can only have one employer. 
  • You must register your application at the Application Portal before delivering your documents. Please use the application form for "Work", and the checklist for "trainees".

Residence permit for studies

Checklists with the required documents for various kinds of applications for residence permit for studies can be found at UDI’s homepage. Please find and prepare the one that is relevant for your situation. Note that even if the checklist is listed under “work” on the UDI page, you must apply for residence permit for studies.

If your residence permit is granted the date of entry is usually set to a short period of time before the start of your studies.

Here follows some of the most common types of residence permits for studies. For a full overview and more detailed information about each type, please refer to UDI’s homepage.

Residence permit for studies at university or similar

  • You must be admitted to an approved full-time education programme.
  • You must possess sufficient financial means. For students at regular universities this must correspond to the full support amount from the Norwegian State Education Loan Fund. For students at a folk high school (folkehøyskole) the amount may vary.
  • Your financial means must be documented either by the Norwegian educational institution, or by a bank certificate from a Norwegian bank in your name. Bank certificates from Japanese or other foreign banks will not be accepted. Most applicants may not be able to open a bank account in Norway. In this case you must contact your educational institution in Norway for information about transferring funds to their deposit account. The educational institution can then issue a guarantee for your financial means. In many cases the educational institution writes guarantees for their students in the acceptance letter. If your acceptance letter contains information that confirms that you have sufficient funds, you do not need to submit additional documentation for financial means.
  • You must be guaranteed accommodation. This is often guaranteed in the admission letter from the educational institution.
  • If your permit is granted, you may work part time – up to 20 hours per week.
  • You must intend to leave Norway when your residence permit expires. You do however not have to buy a return ticket to Japan before entering Norway.
  • You must register your application at the Application Portal before delivering your documents. Please use the application form for "Studies", and the checklist for "students and high school students". For folk high school use the checklist for "folk high school or denominational college students."

Residence permit for researchers with own funds

  • You must have an invitation to carry out research at a university, research institute or similar. 
  • You must be able to support yourself (have own funds) for the whole period which a residence permit is granted. This must correspond to the full support amount from the Norwegian State Education Loan Fund. The funds can be documented by bank savings, salary from employer outside of Norway, study grants, etc.  
  • You must be guaranteed accommodation. Your university or research institute can often help you guarantee for accommodation.
  • You must register your application at the Application Portal before delivering your documents. Please use the application form for "Studies", and the checklist for "researcher with own funds".

 

Residence permit for family immigration

Checklists with the required documents for an application for residence permit can be found at UDI’s homepage. Please find and prepare the one that is relevant for your situation.

If your residence permit is granted you must usually enter Norway and register at the local police station within 6 months from the date your permit was granted.

For more detailed information about family immigration, please refer to UDI’s homepage.

Family immigration with a reference person living in Norway

  • You must have a close relative living in Norway, or applying for a residence permit that qualifies for family immigration. 
  • Applicants over 18 years of age with parents living in Norway do usually not qualify for family immigration. Further, applicants with a child over 18 years of age living in Norway do usually not qualify for family immigration.  
  • The person living in Norway, the sponsor, must document sufficient future and past income. Please see document checklist for further details. 
  • It is possible to apply for family immigration to a police station in Norway after entering the country as long as your stay in Norway is legal, and as long as a Schengen visa is not the basis of your stay in Norway. 
  • You must register your application at the Application Portal before delivering your documents. Please use the application form for "Family immigration", and the checklist according to your relation to the reference person.

Family immigration with a fiancé living in Norway

  • The residence permit for a fiancé is meant for applicants that need a visa to enter Norway. Japanese citizens are exempt from the visa duty, and can enter Norway and get married within the allowed 90 days. It is also possible to apply for regular family immigration while you are in Norway, and if you do you will be allowed to stay until your application has been handled.
  • The Embassy advises Japanese, and other visa exempt applicants to not apply for this residence permit, but rather apply for regular family immigration with reference person living in Norway after getting married. This will save you both time and money.
  • The residence permit can be valid up to 6 months, and you have to get married within this period.  
  • In addition to requirements for regular family immigration, you must document that you are able to get married in Norway.  
  • After you get married you must make a new application for regular family immigration if you want to stay in Norway. You can apply while you are in Norway. 
  • You must register your application at the Application Portal before delivering your documents. Please use the application form for "Family immigration", and the checklist for "family immigration for those who are getting married".

Family immigration with EEA national living in Norway

  • Family members of EEA nationals that live in Norway do not have to apply for residence permit under certain conditions. 
  • The EEA national must exercise their right of residence in Norway, which means that they must be an employee, self-employed, a service provider, have sufficient funds or be a student in Norway. 
  • Passport holders that are exempt of visa can freely travel to Norway and register under the registrations scheme at a local police station. Citizens that need a visa to enter Norway must contact the Embassy to have an entry visa issued, but do not need to apply for Schengen visa.
  • Read more about the registration scheme.

Rights and obligations

Depending on your type of residence permit, some rights and obligations may apply to you.

Membership in the Norwegian National Insurance Scheme

If you live in Norway, you are as a general rule a member of the National Insurance Scheme.

In order for you to be considered resident in Norway, your stay in Norway must last, or be intended to last, for at least 12 months. Membership requires that your stay in Norway is legal. When you move to Norway to be here for at least 12 months, you become a member from your date of entry to Norway.

You will not be a member in the National Insurance Scheme if you have a residence permit that is valid for less than a year, i.e. residence permits based on short term studies or work, working holiday, fiancé living in Norway. You must enter into a separate medical or travel insurance for the duration of your stay in Norway.

See NAVs homepage for more information.

Entering and leaving Norway

You can travel into and out of Norway for as long as the permit is valid, but you must be resident in Norway for most of the year. Your family immigration permit can be withdrawn (revoked) if you are not resident in Norway for most of the year.

Norwegian language studies

If your residence permit forms the basis for a permanent residence permit (settlement permit), you can attend Norwegian language courses free of charge. Contact your local municipal or IMDI for more information.

Permanent residence permit

If your residence permit forms the basis for a permanent residence permit (settlement permit), you can apply for such a permit after three years in Norway. Whether or not your residence permit forms the basis for a permanent residence permit is stated in the decision concerning your permit.

Other

  • Contact the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service (NAV) (www.nav.no) if you have any questions about work or benefits.
  • Contact the Norwegian Directorate of Integration and Diversity (IMDI – www.imdi.no) if you have any question about rights relating to integration, such as language courses.
  • Contact the Norwegian Tax Administration (www.skatteetaten.no) to notify a change of address and to receive answers to questions concerning e.g. personal identity number and taxation.
  • Contact the Directorate of Immigration (UDI) about any changes in circumstances that are relevant to your residence permit.

 



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